Archive for March, 2014

Allotment currants and seedlings again

currant bushesThe first workshop of 2014 will take place next Saturday, 29 March – we’re going to be looking at propagating perennial crops and plot #103 was not looking as I would wish it to look!

To add to the problem, OH has done something to his back. It happened last night, and so he wasn’t available to help with the heavy work today. On my plan was to cover the broad beans and new strawberry plants against tonight’s predicted heavy frost, to weed and mulch the currants in advance of putting up their fruit net in the next fortnight and to repot some of the greenhouse seedlings.

What wasn’t on my plan was to dig up and move the lovage. But when I thought about it, I remembered that one of the problems we had last year was the lovage growing too tall for the fruit cage. It can easily make six feet in a single year!

LovageSo out came the fork and up it came … it sounds so easy, but it was half an hour of back aching work just to dig the whole plant out, then another twenty minutes to dig a new hole to relocate it in the medicinal garden, to divide it into three; one main plant to go back in the ground and two smaller ones (which I had to separate from the parent by wedging a trowel into the root system and hammering it with a mallet) to give away. It had huge roots and I’m really glad I got it out of the ground now, as it must have been competing with the currants for nutrients and they’ll almost certainly do better now it’s not hogging all the goodness in the soil. I’ll bet I’ll be pulling out baby lovage plants for a few years though, as I’m certain I didn’t manage to lift all the roots and although I went back and dug out the broken ones, I’m bound to have missed a few.

Lovage is not much grown now, although it’s an attractive sculptural plant, because not everybody likes the strong ‘celery with a hint of liquorice’ fragrance. Also it’s very rarely eaten these days although it is still used to make a liqueur that was once recommended as being good for the digestion. We grow it to eat with lentils and other pulses in summer as it’s said to have a flatulence reducing effect. We enjoy the flavour too though, so it’s not just medicinal (or social acceptability) in our case! It definitely counts as a crop and if you have space for it on your allotment, can be a useful way to fill an otherwise unused corner as long as you don’t mind dividing it every few years.

mulched currantOur local council turns Christmas trees into chippings and deposits them on allotment sites so once I’d hand weeded out all the goose-grass, baby thistles and brambles that had just emerged, I planned to put down a couple of barrowloads to mulch the currants.

Then the hail came down in stinging torrents so I took cover in the greenhouse and repotted the kohlrabi while I waited for it to pass. It hailed for long enough for me to do the kohlrabi, and some lettuce and both the lovage!

Two barrows of wet chippings did a good job of mulching the currants, although I might go and get a third barrow in the week. It’s important not to let mulch touch the stem of a plant, as this can soften the bark and weaken the plant, allowing bacteria and viruses to enter, so there’s a clear circle around each plant, then a layer of mulch to trap moisture, limit weed germination and provide some insulation against this March weather which is definitely a case of ‘in like a lamb, out like a lion!’

So we’re ready for next week and although the plot still doesn’t look as I would wish, it’s a lot tidier than it was ….

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Root-trainers and broad beans

broad bean planting

I started by digging out holes for the broad beans

broad beans root-trainers

The beans looked sturdy enough, but what would the root development be like?

broad bean root development

Once opened the root-trainers revealed strong root development

broad bean cloches

The only problem? The first set of cloches were too small to cover all the broad beans!

broad bean seedlings being planted

Larger cloches were the answer. Of 36 bean seeds sown, only two failed to germinate

broad beans in cloche

The broad beans covered with fleece for a week to allow them to fully harden off.

This is the first year we’ve used root-trainers rather than biodegradable pots and I’m impressed with the results so far. After ten days of leaving the beans out during the day and putting them in the shed overnight to avoid potential frosts, I was ready to plant them out…

Today’s harvest was red kale for dinner and some rhubarb which I’m experimenting with – I have a new Paleo rhubarb custard recipe to cook, and if it’s any good the Grow and Tell workshop attendees will get to try it on 29 March.

If you live around Brighton and Hove you’d like to learn to grow your own food (whether you have an allotment or just containers) and particularly if you’re interested in growing your own food to eat Paleo, why not come along to this year’s workshops? On 29 March we’ll be looking at propagating perennial crops like rhubarb and growing exotics like lemongrass. £5.00 per session. Email growandtell@hotmail.com to reserve a place.

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